Airing Pain 113: Translating Chronic Pain

Using creative writing to better represent the chronic pain experience. This edition is funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council. Chronic pain often exists ways that cannot be seen. Due to the intangible and ambiguous nature of many chronic pain conditions that lack clear-cu
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Airing Pain 111: Physiotherapy, Mind, Body and the Social Component

Anxiety and expectations, how “fear circuitry” affects self-management, and the importance of social prescribing. This edition is supported by friends of Pain Concern. Director of CSPC Physiotherapy in Leeds, Alison Rose, specialises in working with high-level athletes, particularly t
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Transcript – Airing Pain 99: Transition Services for Adolescents with Chronic Pain

Going through adolescence can be a difficult process for anyone, but for young adults with chronic pain the difficulties of these formative years can become multifaceted. With 8% of young people in the 13-18 age range affected by chronic pain (15,000 living with arthritis alone), the
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Airing Pain 108: Gender Differences

How men and women experience pain, arming yourself with the right information, and not being embarrassed about your condition.   This edition’s been part funded by the Women’s Fund of Scotland. Do women and men experience pain differently, or is it only our attitudes towards pain
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Airing Pain 105: Singing, Laughter, Speech & Pleasure

Singing, laughing and the feel good factor. Pain Management, the fun way. This edition was funded by the Charles Wolfson Charitable Trust. The British Pain Society’s Annual Scientific Meeting (ASM) allows the multidisciplinary nature of the society to be reflected through seminars, sc
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Airing Pain 99: Transition Services for Adolescents with Chronic Pain

Going through adolescence can be a difficult process for anyone, but for young adults with chronic pain the difficulties of these formative years can become multifaceted. With 8% of young people in the 13-18 age range affected by chronic pain (15,000 living with arthritis alone), the
Continue Reading →