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What is self-management?

‘You have to want to live again.’ That’s the key to managing pain, according to Diane. It can be a long, winding road, but many people living with pain have learned strategies that help them to get the most out of life alongside their condition, rather than being dominated by it.

Top tip: make pacing more appealing. Start by choosing an activity you find rewarding and enjoyable. Then, build up slowly and steadily to doing more.

Find out more: Pain Concern’s booklet A Guide to Managing Pain is a great place to start learning about the things you can do to manage your pain, including pacing and dealing with flare-ups.

To read the transcript of this programme, please click here.

Published September 2015. Text to be reviewed September 2018.

Comments

Perfectly said, I absolutely agree.

Thank you, just the reminder I needed on a very bad day. 🙂

So helpful 5 days off morphene and sitting and hobbling about in pain. Years of it meant I know I will always be in pain. Your video helped on this day with no spoons, I will search on for relief beyond drugs and use your ideas.
There will be so many more of us surviving illness or accident and living with it. There is a need for more funding and help. There are excellent doctors we just wait too long to see them.

Thanks for your comments, Amanda. Really glad you found the video helpful.

All the best,

Tom

It’s great to read something that’s both enjoyable and provides prsamatigdc solutions.

I’m glad this comes up on my page,,ive been to possil mtg but had to leave due to ongoing pain haven’t been back yet with so many diff probs it wears me down so much ,but would go back again if offered a afternoon apt

So, I have had Stenosis back pain for ten years. Been through the paracetamol, ibuprofen, codein, amiltryptaline, Buphrenorphine and now Dencino 50 over the years.

Amiltyptaline worked for a while but my leg pain became so bad, I could hardly walk. I was made to go on the cheaper Fencino as Buphrenorphine was expensive but it is the only thing which eased my pain.

I have kept to the same doses for years as I initially tried the Fencino 75 but couldn’t tolerate it. Gabapentin does not even touch my sciatica.

So, I am not addicted but do not want to go back to the agonizing pain of yesteryear and end up in a wheelchair. I manage my condition, can walk short distances with a walker but have to sit down several times during a trip to a supermarket.

During a ten minute appointment with a Nurse Practitioner I had never seen before, she said she would have me off the Fencino. I felt, It was just part of a government reduction scheme and no thought had been given to my management of my own condition.

I am addicted not to go back to how it was, as it had me in constant pain and tears. Reading many reports, the pain angle was not addressed or even reported as it would occur as anxiety or stress would kick in as if this was a reason to ignore the very relevant reasons the medication was prescribed initially. Anxiety and stress are very good get out of jail cards for ignoring what patients who are or will be in acute pain will be telling doctors.

If is it a chronic condition, it is not likely to get better or the pain reduced, so this will mean, wheelchair mobility, full time carers for personal care and agony for the sufferer.

Where other forms of treatment are suitable for younger patients, it is very cruel to inflict this on the elderly who have aging bodies and long term conditions and their future is bleak indeed. I know, I am one and if my pain goes back to how it was with the same ineffective medication, I hope I do not live a very long life, the future looks agonizing.

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